Saturday, October 12, 2013

The Top 10 Cloth Diapering Myths

"Cloth diaper washing takes hours and hours"
You have to buy special cloth diaper detergent"
"Bleach is the devil and will cause your diapers to fall apart"
"Too much detergent will make your diapers stink/repel etc"
"You have to use tons of water to wash cloth diapers"
"You have to "strip" cloth diapers all the time"
"Cloth diapering is super expensive"
"Day cares don't allow cloth diapers"

^^ Any of these statements sound familiar? I had heard every single one of them back when I was still in the googling phase of cloth diapering. I was scared that cloth diapering would be complicated and expensive and almost gave up before I even started. Thankfully I learned that these are all a bunch of myths and that cloth diapering can be easy, cheap, and something any family can do. Let's get myth busting :)


Myth #1
 Diapers require elaborate wash routines and use specialty "cloth diaper safe detergent"

Rinse-Wash (with detergent)-Rinse

It really is that easy. You can wash diapers in any machine (HE machines included) with a simple pre-rinse, long heavy duty wash and 1-2 rinses. That is it, it should only take you 10-20 more minutes than washing a regular load of towels (for information on temperature and detergent keep reading). Washing diapers is just like washing extra dirty clothes.

You don't need some fancy pants 9 step wash routine that you got off of Pinterest. You don't need 3 full cycles. You don't and shouldn't add extra water to your washing machine. You don't need to endlessly rinse your diapers.

If washing diapers is like washing clothing than do I need special cloth diaper detergent? 

NOPE! This is the BIGGEST MYTH EVER! I am totally guilty of believing it too. I foolishly shucked out the extra dollars for some fancy pants cloth diaper detergent called Rocking Green. The only thing it rocked at doing was leaving urine residue that built up and left us with burn your nose hairs ammonia. I looked up their ingredients and low and behold its glorified homemade detergent (which is actually not detergent but a bunch of water softeners and oxiclean) that I could have made for pennies. I believe the whole cloth diaper safe detergent myth is a straight up marketing ploy. The worse offenders at spreading this lie are those diaper companies who sell their own detergents like Cotton Babies (Bum Genius) and Thirsties, a coincidence? I think not.

So what can I use? ANY MAINSTREAM LAUNDRY DETERGENT WITHOUT SYNTHETIC SOFTENERS so skip the Tide with a Touch of Downey/All with Snuggle and you are golden. No more multiple bottles/boxes of detergent for diapers and clothe. Take that Tide, Gain, Arm and Hammer, Sun or whatever it is that you use on your clothes and go on ahead and try it on you diapers, it will probably work awesome and certainly much better than some fancy pants cloth diaper safe detergent. As you may have noticed all these detergents have most or all of the so called scary "perfumes, dyes, optical brighteners, and additives" that you are told to stay away from, none of them will hurt your diapers, I promise.

As for wanting to use "all natural" detergents that obviously fine too just make sure that you use enough to completely clean your diapers oftentimes their recommended 2 tablespoons is almost never going to cut it. IF YOUR DIAPERS STINK OR HAVE AMMONIA THEY ARE NOT CLEAN. (The only naturalish detergent I had work was Seventh Generation but we had to use extra and it just made it to expensive, Ecos was a complete bust).

If you still don't believe me that non "cloth diaper safe detergents" won't cause your diapers to lose absorbency, be ruined or the like then check out these diaper companies, cloth diaper stores,and groups that also suggest using mainstream detergents to clean cloth diapers.

Rumparooz mentions Tide and Gain as their top 2 recommended detergents
http://www.kanga-care.com/Cloth-Diaper-FAQ_ep_42-1.html#howto

Grovia also has Tide and the super cheap brand Sun in their list of detergents:
http://www.gro-via.com/laundry-extras-detergents.html

Fuzzi Bunz recommends Tide Free and Gentle 
http://www.fuzzibunz.com/faq.php#wash9


Tiny Tush also recommends Tide and the like
http://www.tinytush.com/How-To-Wash-Cloth-Diapers_ep_51-1.html

Best Bottoms states that "Tide works for our diapers"
http://www.bestbottomdiapers.com/features.html

Imagine Diapers from Imagine Baby Products "recommends Tide"
http://www.imaginebabyproducts.com/cloth-diapering-101.html

Bummis lists Tide Free and Gentle on their list of detergents. 
http://www.bummis.com/media/detergent-information.pdf

Green Mountain Diapers says " Keep it simple. Use what you would normally use on your regular household laundry. Yes, Tide is ok or whatever you happen to like." 
http://www.greenmountaindiapers.com/cloth-eez-prefold-diapers.html

Jillians Drawers a cloth diaper store lists Tide as the only detergent they have never received complaints about.
http://www.jilliansdrawers.com/resources/detergentsforclothdiapers

Abby's Lane another huge cloth diaper store also preaches the benefits of mainstream detergents
http://thecloththatcounts.wordpress.com/2012/01/30/the-ultimate-cloth-diaper-care-resource-page/

Padded Tush Stats has posted various articles praising Tide and similar detergents. They even conducted large surveys of people using various detergents and found that Tide had the lowest reported incidences of diaper wear and tear (like holes, pilling, etc.)
http://paddedtushstats.com/2012/01/06/what-detergents-damage-cloth-diapers-sneak-peek-at-the-stats/
http://paddedtushstats.com/2012/08/13/save-yourself-the-stress-wash-your-cloth-diapers-with-tide/

*Note: The use of mainstream detergents is against the warranty of several diaper companies (Bum Genius and Thirsties). However, that being said I would rather have clean diapers above all else. The health of my baby's bum is more important than a warranty.

** So called "Homemade Cloth Diaper Detergent" recipes are all over Pinterest/Blogosphere. Most are a combination of Oxiclean, Borax and Washing Soda. 2 of the 3 are water softeners and the 3rd is a powdered form of hydrogen peroxide. None of these are surfectants that actually remove the soil and suspend it until it can be washed away and as such the soil can often be redeposited on the diapers causing bacteria producing stink. Recipes that include bar soap on the other hand will leave soap scum in your diapers, which can cause repelling and leave soap scum in your washing machine.
 http://www.cleaninginstitute.org/clean_living/soaps__detergents_chemistry.aspx

Myth #2
 You can't bleach diapers


While several cloth diaper brands print warnings against bleaching, others like Bum Genius, Grovia and Cloth Eeze all recommend/approve of the occasional bleaching of diapers. I believe that bleach plays an important role in cloth diapering. I believe it should a) be used to sanitize diapers that have been exposed to yeast b) on diapers that were previously owned, and c) on diapers that have bacteria/ammonia build up from inadequate laundering. Notice I don't mention keeping a wet pail with bleach solution as this is a safety hazard for children and can greatly reduce the life of PUL and elastics.

Bleaching should be done with sanitizing bleach (see paragraph on buying bleach) at a ratio of 1 tbs bleach to 1 gallon cold water. It should be done after the diapers have been washed and at a cold temperature (bleach breaks down in hot water). For step by step instructions check out my bleach post.

 If you are worried about your machine not diluting the bleach properly you can bleach your already washed diapers in the bathtub.  If your diapers are made of PUL/TPU they will not fade (both are color fast).  Cotton,  flannel and other similar natural fibers may experience slight fading (this can be minimized by carefully and accurately diluting the bleach). Never bleach wool or other animal hairs. Also do not use bleach if your water has a very high Iron content, *see below for alternatives

 You have to be very careful when buying bleach as lots of types of bleach are not for sanitizing but only for whitening or deodorizing. I suggest the classic, not the color safe, scented, linen, splashless, or gentle care etc. just the plain original clorox (or generic) bleach that says it kills the flu etc. You also need to make sure the concentration of Sodium Hypochlorate is at least 5.25% but ideally is closer to 8.25%.


          You can also use Oxygen based bleaches like Oxyclean, or any of its generics for getting out those stubborn poop stains. I really like Biz, it is a mix of oxygen bleach and enzymes (I regularly add a few tbs. to my prewash. You can also add boosters to the wash or apply them directly to stains. Just remember OXYGEN BASED BLEACHES ARE NOT FOR SANITIZING only for stain removal.

* Bleaching your diapers may void the warranty of several diaper companies. However, if you purchase diapers used they are already out of warranty and if your baby gets a yeast infection I have to argue that getting rid of the yeast and its spores trumps not voiding a warranty.  For a closer look at bleach alternatives and why Grapefruit Seed Extract is not one of them look here.

**Chlorine Bleach should not be done if your water has a high iron content. In that situation you should use Hydrogen Peroxide (not color safe bleach, GSE, TTO) and borax 3 cups of hydrogen peroxide and 1 cup borax. I don't recommend boiling because you can actually melt microfiber and diaper snaps.

*** Still concerned? Or for a fantastic look out how proper bleach use doesn't harm PUL or elastic this blog has a great mini study.

Myth #3 
That diapers should only be washed in 1/4 the recommended amount of detergent and that detergent  build up will lead to stink, ammonia or cause your diapers to repel. 

I have no idea how the idea got around that using regular detergent or the recommended amount of detergent can cause your diaper to stink etc. but it is a complete and utter lie. Women have been washing diapers for hundreds of years I am sure that they didn't wash them with less soap than their regular clothing. Washing diapers involves washing HUMAN WASTE so you certainly need to be using as much or more than what you would use on clothes. My rule is is 10 diapers is Line 1, 20 for line 2 and 30 diapers for Line 3, its not a scientific amount but it give you a general idea of how much detergent to use. None of this 1/4 the recommended amount crap. Use the appropriate size for the load and soil level just as you would with clothing, diapers are no different.

I believe the only reason people began using such tiny amounts of detergents is because it is what their expensive "cloth diaper detergent" bottle told them to do it. The only reason they told them to do it is so that said detergents would not look as insanely expensive as they actually are. For example Rocking Green is 17 cents a load but that amount is only one tablespoon to actually get diapers clean you would probably need an upwards of 4 tablespoons making it four times as expensive as powdered Tide Ultra is at Costco. Basically just use the amount you need to get your diapers clean, don't go dumping the a whole scoop in for 10 diapers and don't expect 2 tablespoons to clean 15+ diapers. Use common sense.

I love this statement from Grovia, they agree that using enough detergent is incredibly important. Their note on eco friendly detergents is also helpful.  "Use enough detergent.  Use the FULL amount of detergent recommended on your detergent packaging.  Eco friendly detergents are great but don't always clean really well.  If you go with an eco friendly detergent pick a salt based one (not one with coconut or other plant oils as a main ingredient), and use enough.  In fact, you may need to use a bit more than recommended. - See more at: http://www.gro-via.com/blog/enough-stripping-already/#sthash.DPW5oZd0.dpuf

I have heard people mention bubbles as proof that detergent "builds up," while I don't believe that detergent can magically build up load after load until diaper inserts are so full of detergent that they can't absorb pee (this is not true with soap but detergent and soap are not the same thing). Sure you may have some residue  left behind after washing, you can see the bubbles still left when you rinse on occasion even. But they are just that "residue" not "build up."  This detergent residue is not going to cause any problems unless your baby is hyper sensitive to detergent. In which case add a second or third rinse to your wash routine or switch detergents. Do not keep rinsing over and over until the bubbles are gone. If the diapers don't feel soapy (or technically detergent coated would be more accurate) out of the washing machine you are good to go.

The perplexing issue of "build up" in regards to diapers developing a greasy residue (that can cause repelling) was addressed by Bummis (a diaper company that has been in business over 20 years) on their Facebook page on January 24th 2012. He stated that the issue is that people not using enough detergent  "leads to microscopic soil being left behind. In fecal matter there are oils/fats from digestion. Polyester loves fats and oils and forms a chemical bond with them. If you are using too little detergent to release this soil, you will then get a microscopic build up of oils on the surface of the fabric eventually causing it to repel or stink."  If knowing fecal matter is being left behind by inadequate detergent use isn't enough to convince you to use enough detergent I don't know what will. 

Some people also believe that detergent build up is responsible for ammonia build up, when in fact the opposite is true.  Ammonia in and off itself is a natural occurring phenomenon based on how urine breaks down outside the body. However, by not using enough detergent (or by using too much water) bacteria residue combines with the ammonia carbonate to create ammonia build up within the diaper fibers. Since ammonia build up can cause chemical burns on a child you certainly need to make sure that you are laundering your diapers with enough detergent to ensure that this never happens in the first place. If you already have ammonia build up you will need to do a bleach soak (see the above note on bleach).

In a nutshell, use enough detergent to get your diapers clean You don't need to dump the whole box in but don't expect diapers to get magically clean with a microscopic amount of detergent. Nor should you worry about rinsing over and over again, once or twice is fine.

Myth #4
You have to wash diapers in hot water and lots of it.

Its rather common knowledge that boiling temperatures are required to purify water. The same principle applies to laundry. If the water isn't boiling it is just washing something not actually sanitizing them. This is absolutely fine as washing diapers them is all you need to 99% of the time. As such wash in whatever temperature you feel like they are getting clean from the soap and the agitation not the water temperature. Some machines especially the newer HE machines wrongfully list a sanitize setting (my machine does) that uses extra hot water, but this water rarely stays at temperatures high enough and for long enough to actually sanitize the diapers. Worse yet using these so called super high temperatures to wash diapers can lead the elastics to wear out faster, and the energy used to heat the water just wastes electricity or gas.

I do my pre-wash on cold because its what my machine does automatically, I do my long wash on warm to help rinse of the petroleum based creams I sometimes use (another myth I plan to address later). I rinse twice on cold (also what my machine does automatically).

So if you need to actually sanitize your diapers (such as if you have bought used diapers or are trying to get rid of Yeast or a disease like Hand Foot and Mouth) you need to use the actual sanitizing bleach method mentioned above rather than relying on "hot water."

Many members of the cloth diaper world are also obsessed with using tons of water as part of their wash routines. This can cause you to end up with what a few cloth diaper experts call diaper soup. With diaper soup the diapers just float around in the water instead of agitating against one another. What you want to see is that the diapers look like they are in a stew. So don't go adding extra water to your HE machine, let the agitation of the diapers against themselves and the detergent do the work of getting your diapers clean.

For more information on washing consult my Cloth Diapering 101 page.

Myth #5 
Cloth diaper laundry requires elaborate "stripping" methods

Stripping cloth diapers is a term used to describe processes that remove detergent build up, oily residue/stink, or mineral deposits, it also refers to getting diapers to clean like new state. It usually entails on of the following methods:

a)  Repeatedly rinsing cloth diapers in hot water to rid them of detergent residue or to sanitize them.
b) Washing them in Dawn dish soap.
c) Boiling
d) Soaking them in a mineral deposit remover like RLR laundry treatment 

First off detergent does not cause problematic detergent residue nor does hot water sanitize diapers (unless that water is boiling or contains chlorine bleach). Second of all putting Dawn or any other dish soap will possibly break your washing machine and void its warranty (hand scrubbing with Dawn is great for diaper creams stains on synthetic diapers though). Boiling diapers is also a horrible idea. Snaps and PUL can melt (boiling as part of prepping natural fibers is much different).

 Not only does my detergent not cause reduced absorbency/residue that would lead to using methods A or B it also includes a substantial amount of water softening agents that prevent mineral build up (method C).

The only special "stripping" treatment cloth diapers should undergo is occasional bleaching for sanitizing used diapers or those exposed to fungal and bacterial infections. See the aforementioned bleaching myth section. Extremely hard water areas may still need to mineral strip but its rare, and adding . If your water is extremely hard adding a water softening agent like Calgon or washing soda in with detergent to prevent the need for periodic mineral deposit stripping.

Don't let tales of elaborate "stripping" escapades scare you from cloth diapering. I am happy to report that since using a adequate amount of mainstream detergent (I use Tide or Kirtland) that I have NEVER HAD TO STRIP MY DIAPERS

* I am really proud of Grovia, they came out with an excellent blog article on why you shouldn't need to strip diapers regularly. I am glad to see some common sense regarding diaper stripping. http://www.gro-via.com/blog/enough-stripping-already/

Myth #6
No fabric softener EVER!

While it is still absolutely true that you should not use synthetic softeners on your diapers ever (though you are welcome to still use them on your other laundry, its a myth that softeners leave a residue in your machine). You can use plant based softeners on your natural fiber diapers. Plant based softener unlike synthetic petroleum based softeners, soften the individual fibers of fabric rather than just coating them.

Sustainablebabyish is a well known and highly regarded brand of fitteds and wool and they personally suggest using ecover softener of their fitteds http://sloomb.myshopify.com/pages/care although my personal favorite has been Mrs. Meyers. Padded Tush stats and also did a mini study on the use of natural fabric softeners and their participants did not report repelling. http://paddedtushstats.com/2012/10/11/is-ecover-fabric-softener-really-good-to-use-on-cloth-diapers/

I have successfully used Mrs Meyers, Ecover, Seventh Generation, Method and Sprouts store brand softener on cotton, bamboo and other natural fibers without any loss of absorbency or repelling. Best of all as you would assume it makes them dreamy soft and delightfully scented. I am sold on it.

*Please remember to remove all your synthetic fiber diapers like Microsuede (like Bum Genius Pocket Shells), Microfiber (a common synthetic diaper insert)  and Microfleece (like what is used in Sunbaby and Fuzzibunz) before using a natural softener.

Myth #7
No diaper creams/powders 

This myth has some truth to it. You really should not ever use petroleum based diaper creams on your synthetic fibers diapers. They will leave stains and cause repelling. HOWEVER, you can use several non petroleum based cloth diaper creams straight on your synthetic diapers like California Baby (at Target and works on all fibers), Earth Momma Angel Baby Balm (Sprouts), CJ's Butter (online). If a diaper cream has no petroleum but has zinc it may stain but it will not cause repelling, this is the case with the Natural Formula Boudreaux Butt Paste (Target) and sometimes with California Baby). Unrefined Coconut Oil available at any grocery store, although Costco or Sams Club is by far the cheapest.


What might really blow your mind is that on natural fibers diapers (with the exclusion of charcoal bamboo), particularly prefolds and flats you can pretty much use anything. I have used Aveeno, Lotramin/Nystatin, Desitin, Calmoseptine, Butt Paste, Critic-aid and even straight Vaseline on my baby's bum and it has all washed out just fine (I attribute this to using enough detergent). However, if you still want to use these non cloth diaper safe creams with a synthetic fiber diaper (like micro fleece, suede clothe and some charcoal bamboo) you still,  can but should  use a flush able liner,  cotton fabric scraps, Viva paper towel or fleece liner. If some of these creams ever does get on your synthetic fabric diapers you can remove the residue with a toothbrush and blue Dawn (never ever add dish soap to your laundry machine).

As for baby powder and other medicated powders they are completely cloth diaper compatible. In our experience we have found them far superior to creams. Our favorite by far is Caldesene (available at Walgreens and Babies R Us)



* Some cloth diaper safe creams even though they will not cause repelling may stain. This is a function of the active ingredient Zinc Oxide. So decide for yourself if that is something you are concerned about. A good rule is that if its super goopy and sticky it probably won't wash out but if its a lotion type consistency its probably fine.

** Burt Bees diaper cream although it is petroleum free didn't even wash out of my natural fibers so use it at your own risk. 

Myth #8
Cloth diapering is always super expensive to start

If you are willing to put in the effort you can cloth diaper a baby with Flour Sack Walmart Dish Towels, DIY t-shirt flats and homemade fleece or wool covers for under $50 bucks. You can also buy easy pocket diapers from China at 5 dollars a piece (I highly recommend Sunbaby, Alvababy and Kawaii). Or you can be like me and shop seconds sales (where stores sell cosmetically imperfect diapers), buy used, or wait for Black Friday. Its true there really are $25 diapers but you don't have to use them, you can still cloth diaper easily without them.

For more info check out my posts on "ultra low budget cloth diapering" and "cloth diapering for $150"


Myth #9 
Cloth diapering is only for stay at home moms and dads. 

I think this myth started in part because some people that cloth diaper have unnecessarily complicated wash routines. Washing should only include a pre-wash, long wash, and 1-2 rinses that's it. Then toss those babies in the dryer (yep everything really can go in there) and you are done with laundry. While pockets or all in twos will require the extra step of stuffing or snapping in inserts you instead buy pre-assembled all in one diapers that require no additional effort.

The other half of the cloth diapering is for stay at home parents is the myth that you cannot use cloth diapers in daycares.  In the majority of states there are no laws restricting or prohibiting cloth diapers in daycares. Some may be hesitant but by bringing in your easiest to put on cloth diaper and teaching them that all they have to do it roll it up after a change and pop it in a wetbag they will see that it is no harder for them than a disposable. Most states have no laws about cloth diapering in daycare facilities. In a few there are laws surrounding cloth diapering but they mention things like making sure the cloth diapers are stored in a sealed container, which is something you would want done anyways. In the other 5 states cloth diapering is restricted to those that supply a Dr's note. However, even this does not bar you from cloth diapering in that almost any pediatrician or family Dr. would be willing to write a note saying that cloth is beneficial to your child. 

For access to you individual state's laws about cloth diapering link s to them can be found here:


Myth #10 

Cloth diapering involves touching poop more often than disposable diapering. 

Warning: This section is a little explicit, read at your own risk. 

I don't know if you have ever changed a baby's diaper or not but changing a diaper involves coming into close contact with baby excrement, it is just part of the deal. The awesome thing about cloth diapers is that if the diaper is properly put on blowouts are practically unheard of.  I for one would much rather use a cloth diaper and have all that poop stay inside the diaper than relive the epic blowouts we had when my older son was disposable diapered.

What about swishing the poop off into the toilet? Well let me say it loud and proud that I would NEVER CLOTH DIAPER WITHOUT MY DIAPER SPRAYER I just simply could not do it. If you can't hook up a sprayer you alternatively can use flush able diaper liners. Or better yet if your baby is exclusively breast fed you can toss their diapers right into the pail until wash day (EBF poo is water soluble). I love how my diaper sprayer not only cleans off diapers but can clean off vomit and be used as a bidet. I plan to keep it attached well beyond our diapering days. I purchased mine for a steal on Ebay (20 something bucks shipped), you can also make your own or buy one from a number of cloth diaper retailers, they are so worth it.


Conclusion:
Cloth diapers are much easier than even diaper companies say they are. You can wash them easily and cheaply. They are an option for families with budgets from $50-$500 dollars. If you would like any laundry assistance or help getting started with cloth diapering let me know I would love to help you. 





112 comments:

  1. Great article!!! I am buying some Tide tomorrow!!! Thanks for all the helpful info!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Great article, I just recently started using original tide on my diapers and they smell and look so much cleaner with just one wash. My son has eczema so I may have to go with a tide free and clear in the future but so far so good.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Publix free and clear is cheap, and works well. I tried it BECAUSE I read this. It's 10$ as opposed to 18$ for Charlies. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Altaira I am so glad that you ditched the Charlies. It can lead to terrible chemical burns in some kiddos it can be bad news. And it doesn't have any actual surfectants in it. Its a bunch of scouring agents. I hope the pubix free and clear does the trick.

      Delete
    2. Charlies gave my 3 week old son a chemical burn :( BUT they have great customer service and gave me a full refund.

      Delete
  4. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Great myth busting! I used to be one of the "1 tablespoon and 'CD safe' detergent" people and had barnyard I could not get rid of, even when tripled the amount of detergent. A bleaching, decreasing my water amount, and using a healthy amount of real detergent (Gain and Tide mostly) and CD laundry has become easy and problem-free.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Don't worry Tracy I too only used the 1-2 Tablespoons even after I switched from Rocking Green to Tide. It took me a long time to realize the whole build nonsense and finally get some clean diapers. Thanks so much for reading.

      Delete
  6. Wonderful article! Lots of great information <3

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thanks for sharing. I`ve been cloth diapering for 2 years now and I`m battling some major stink (and spend days rinsing and cleaning my diapers). My sister`s kid has been getting major bum rashes and I just told her to RLR. Now I`m going to suggest that we both go out and get some Tide Free and Clear and wash those diapers for real!! I always thought it was odd that I was told to use so little detergent...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If she has hard water though in her situation I would try washing in the Tide f and G then still stripping with RLR and then soaking in bleach, (then rinsing thoroughly) then you get rid of mineral build up and the bacteria causing the ammonia. Ammonia build up can be strictly bacteria or a mineral and bacteria problem combined. Yay for clean diapers!

      Delete
  8. Do you think soaking EBF poop-stained cloth nappies (pocket CDs and MF/bamboo-MF inserts) in water with detergent dissolved in it is bad for the nappies/inserts? Will it delaminate the shells or decrease the inserts' absorbency? How about rubbing detergent into the stains?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Soaking as in pretreating stains is fine. You can even spray oxiclean or biz on them. I wouldn't soak them for long periods like as in using a wet pail because of the bacteria risk. But simply soaking them in detergent for a bit to get out stains will be fine. I have not found anything to get out ebf stains in covers right away. Mostly I find for EBF stains that sun drying them is the best way to go. In the wintertime you can sun them dry in a window or car dashboard.

      Delete
    2. As long as you use enough detergent, have enough agitation (if you are do an HE machine you need 2/3 or 3/4 full. if need be put a towel or two in there, otherwise the clothes don't rub against each other enough to agitate out stains. That's how HE machines work. This is why extra water is not helpful in HE machines) then you won't have stains. My son is on solids and I wash with a pre wash line 1 of Tide and some Calgon (we have extremely off chart hard water) and main wash with 1 full scoop of Tide and 1/2 cup powdered Calgon) (no extra rinses because of hard water) and I do it on Heavy Duty in my HE machine. They come out stain free, stink free, and perfect everytime. I dry in the dryer as well. Gasp! Shock! ;)

      Delete
  9. Thank God. Someone finally making sense!! I have cloth diapered 4 kids, ranging in age from 9 months to 16 years. I never had any issues with ammonia, or barnyard stink until they came out with and I bought into, the cloth diaper safe "detergent. " I am so happy that people are coming around. I always see people refusing to use detergent for ammonia issues because of the chemicals. Hellooo! Ammonia is a chemical too, one that poses a greater risk to your child than mainstream detergents. Thank you for taking the time to write this.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks. I know I cannot believed I bought into the crackpot marketing ploy myself. Cloth diapers are cloth. If they get dirty wash the heck out of them with detergent and sometimes even bleach. They are poo and pee catchers they needed heavy duty stuff to wash them. I too am so annoyed and scared when I see people with ammonia problems trying to use "hot water" to get rid of it all the while its killing their babies poor bum.

      Delete
  10. Do you recommend doing anything different for bamboo/hemp/microfiber, or do your myths apply to ALL diapers? Also, I'm worried about the bleach and the PUL - but you're saying it will be OK?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. PUL is a hospital grade fabric meant to be bleached and dried at high temperatures. It is color fast. My friend had a PUL diaper soak in undiuted bleach overnight on accident and it was totally fine. The only myths that are different from natural fibers and synthetics are the two about softener (natural plant based) and the one on diaper creams. As for bleach it really is fine for PUL. I mention the brands that suggest it in certain situations. The only fabrics at risk of color damage are cotton fitteds and sometimes even they are fine. If you don't trust your bleach dispenser. Do it in the bath tub.

      Delete
  11. THANK YOU! I really appreciate this. I've been having build up issues myself and was feeling a bit run down from trying to figure it all out. Tide I can get!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Its so easy once you have the right detergent, not too much water (you want soup not stew so the diapers can agitate not just swish). Rinse-Wash-Rinse it really can be super easy. I also recommend Gain as well if you prefer those scents. Or Tide Free and Gentle if your baby is sensitive to scents.

      Delete
    2. "Build up" do you mean repelling, stink or mineral build up? Not using enough of a good detergent can lead to mineral build up that can reduce absorbency and lead to ammonia developing. You may need to RLR soak them then bleach them (the bleach kills the bacteria that hides out with the minerals). As I mentioned if its repelling and stinking its probably just fecal build up and bleach alone may be fine.

      Delete
  12. Hi there! I am aboutt to start my first blog and this was very helpful! I use country save and i am now Thinking of switching to tide! Thanks soooo much! You have been an inspiration !

    ReplyDelete
  13. I'm so glad I found this! I had been contemplating clothing my EBF son because of horrendous back and leg blowouts and this nagging rash he has(switching disposable brands only works for a day or so), but it was daunting to hear all the "rules" about cloth diapers that my clothing friends were throwing at me. I went ahead and purchased a discount pack of alva baby brand diapers figuring I'd just wing it with plain old Gain detergent the first few times and see how it goes. I wash all our clothes in it, even the little man's, so I didn't want to try and change it up and risk an eczema breakout. I own two cloth diapers already so I tested them on him to see how they worked for his poo-splosions and sensitive skin. So far no adverse reactions! I'm actually stoked to try cloth now, when just two months ago I refused to even consider it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love Alva diapers! Mine are over two years old and look brand new they have held up awesome. I did eventually need to double up with their bamboo inserts (the 3 layer) but I still love them. I wish my son was still EBF I love not having to rinse those diapers. I agree blowouts are awful. You are so smart for following your gut and using Gain. It is great stuff.

      Delete
    2. Thought I'd pop in and give an update.
      Soon after I posted I received his diapers and I've beeIts using Gain to wash every single time. It's fantastic! No smells, no stains, no leak problems, and no booty irritation! The majority of them still look new (a few diapers seemed to have a cheaper lining inside but still super white, soft and absorbant). I run two wash cycles (first heavy soiled on cold second is a regular wash on warm/hot), an extra rinse cycle to make sure all the detergent is off, and then straight to the dryer on high heat. I can't believe it took me so long to just dive in and go for it haha.

      Delete
    3. You can probably save the water and energy and just do a short quick wash or prerinse and then do your main wash as the heavy duty with the Gain. So glad to hear that your diapers are clean and that jumped in :) Its crazy how much fun it can be when you diapers are all sparkly and clean.

      Delete
    4. Sounds great! I'll try that from now on! I don't know why I didn't think of that first haha

      Delete
  14. When I use my diaper sprayer it sprays the poop all over. If I turn down the flow it wi nt spray off the poop. Any suggestions??

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You may have a lot higher water pressure than me but one trick is to dunk the diaper a bit then spray it. I have the diaper barely above water and the sprayer pointing down. Another trick people do is make a DIY spray pal by cutting the bottom off a dollar store trash can. That may help. Good luck.

      Delete
    2. I have not bought my sprayer yet - was planning to EBF, but my son needed suppliment, so that is where we are at - but Nicki's diapers has a collar for the sprayer to help control the splash, without having to have a shield for your actual diaper. Here's the link to the website:
      http://www.nickisdiapers.com/diaper-dawgs-spray-collar.html

      Delete
  15. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Hi There! What would you suggest I use if I have moderate water (in the middle between really hard and very soft)? I am considering Tide Free and Clear and Purex Free and Clear. Do you think one works better?? I am using Charlie's currently (I know, cardinal sin) and have to bleach every month or I get ammonia issues... I know I should probably do an RLR strip & bleach soak when I make the switch...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If your water is normal I would say that Purex should work great for you. I have super hard water which I why I try to stick with Tide or Kirtland Ultra Clean (or Gain).

      Delete
  17. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  18. My husband accidentally bought the wrong tide and I used tide plus febreze to prep my new prefolds! I used extra rinse cycles and haven't used the diapers yet. Should I do anything now? I'll be buying the regular tide and using that on future washes...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have the febreeze tide it cleans great. I just find the smell over powering. Use any mainstream detergent without synthetic fabric softener and you are golden.

      Delete
  19. You seem to be equating purifying the water with using the water to kill bacteria. But if bacteria are only killed at the temp of boiling water or higher, then wouldn't meat need to be heated to 212 degrees internal temperature before eating? The FDA suggests that the temperature for washing dishes be 110, and most people have their water heater set to 120 or higher.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Purifying water is killing bacteria. You purify water before you drink it. With cloth diapering you are cleaning like you wash dishes.With washing cloth diapers you want to remove the residue of poop and pee just like you remove the food residue from dishes. With cloth diapers if you do not remove the residue of the soil you will end up with bacteria growth. That is when you need to go beyond regular washing and "sanitize your diapers." This would be done with bleach as you dont wan't to boil anything with PUL or elastic (and boiling can shrink your cotton diapers). You do not need to always wash your dishes in boiling water, just like you dont need to always wash your cloth diapers in bleach. As for washing in cold water it does take longer and more agitation but the energy required to wash in cold is still drastically lower than washing in hot water. I personally wash diapers in lukewarm water. As for eating meat, yes you should cook it to 160 degrees (not sure where you got 212). As for setting a water heater you are right most people have them set well below boiling and that is exactly what you should do.

      Delete
  20. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Can you suggest any great CD'ing homemade laundry detergents? I'm a 3rd time mom but this will be my first time CD'ing. Great article, thank you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do not recommend any type of homemade "detergent" because they do not contain surfectants. If you use the oxiclean based recipes you are basically washing them with just water softening agents and oxi clean and if you use a soap bar based recipe you can have soap scum build up that leads to repelling. If you want a natural type detergent I recomend 7th generation. If you need something inexpensive. I recommend, Kirtland Ultra or Target Advanced for a HE machine but for a regular top loader you can use Foca (a mexican detergent) or a industrial detergent that Costco and Kroger sell.

      Delete
    2. Would soap nuts work? According to wiki they have surfectants.

      Delete
    3. I wish to know if Soap Nuts would work too

      Delete
    4. I have read a bunch about people successful CDing with soap nuts, I plan on using them when my LO comes.

      Delete
  22. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Hi, I would like to use your bleach process to help with my ammonia smell. I'm planning on soaking the diapers in the tub. 1 tablespoon per gallon of cold water rt? But for how long? Also I have hard water and use calgon sometimes should I continue to use it? If so at which point in my routine? Current routine is - cold rinse and spin, followed by a hot wash cold rinse and an extra cold rinse. Then hang to dry pockets and stick inserts in the dryer. Thanks for the help!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How much soap are you using and what kind? IF you water is super hard Calgon should be helping the detergent work well enough to keep the ammonia from developing. With hard water I would actually cascade powder (1/4 cup in the bathrub) or RLR strip your diapers before bleaching. The minerals can trap the ammonia pretty badly so its best to get rid of the minerals to maximize the bleach. But yes 1 tablespoon sanitizing bleach to 1 gallon water for at least 30 minutes. For severe ammonia consider an hour or so. The routine wash wise looks fine but you will need to probably use more or a stronger detergent to keep the ammonia away for good.

      Delete
  24. The top 10 Cloth Diapering myths are wonderful. This is very informative post. When you have a baby you have to decide whether you will use baby's cloth diapers, or disposable diapers. Baby's cloth diapers, are better for baby's skin. I love cloth diapers most because they are so cute!
    Baby cloth diapers

    ReplyDelete
  25. I came across your article a couple months ago and just got around to commenting. I made the switch to tide a while back, when before I used to use Nellie's laundry soda. It worked okay when my lo was an itty bitty thing, but as she got older and started solids, the urine and poo stench after washing her diapers was undeniable. Plus I'd take diapers out of the wash with ebf poo still on them! I read something about using regular tide powder on a cloth diapering board and haven't looked back. Your article just confirmed what was said there, and even with evidence about mainstream detergent usage from actual cloth diaper companies I have diapers from. You are absolutely right. What use is a diaper warranty when the thing stinks to high heaven because you aren't using the right amount/ actual detergent that will get diapers clean? I have not seen any extra wear and tear. In fact, my diapers look great! Thanks for this informative article! Now I can send other cloth diapering mamas a link to your article as well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are so sweet. You made my day. Thanks for passing along the info so that every mom can have clean diapers.

      Delete
  26. Excellent post! I must thank you for this informative read. I hope you will post again soon.
    Kind regard
    Heavy Duty Washing Machine Manufacturers

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have done several follow up posts is their anything specific you would like me to post on?

      Delete
  27. Procter & Gamble runs a website called Science in the Box that discusses how their detergents work. Things like optical brighteners and perfumes are intended to build up on the diapers over time, in order to make fabrics look and smell better, longer. There's no conspiracy about detergent build up. This is actually what happens when you use detergent, and the manufacturers are very open about that fact. Chlorine bleach is also corrosive. This isn't a conspiracy. This is on the label of the product and is why Clorox tells people on their website only to use their product as instructed on the label, because too much bleach can cause yellowing and deterioration of fabrics.

    I know lots of people who use Tide on their diapers with great results, and I use bleach on my diapers every so often myself. I think these personal testimonials are valuable and helpful when it comes to enabling people to making choices about how to care for their diapers. But it bothers me when I see junk science being passed off as the gospel or folks talking badly about CD manufacturers, when the CD manufacturers are telling you the same thing the mainstream detergent and bleach companies publicly state about their own products.

    ReplyDelete
  28. I love the science in the box site, it has great information. I do agree that optical brighteners and perfumes deposit. I don't think its a "conspiracy,' and I do think that if you pour in way too much detergent that you will end up with detergent residue. What I do not think that they continually build of over time to ultimately cause "stink, ammonia, or repelling." I do see how those three things can be caused by using "1/4 the manufacturer recommended amount"though and how it "may also allow build-up of mineral deposits in the washer from hard water." (per the P&G website). As for not using enough detergent I think cloth diaper manufacturers are coming around to the idea that you need to use enough detergent. I mention Bummis in my post and recently have also seen Grovia's campaign called "suds" they mention using enough detergent as well. I hope you don't think that I am trying to convince people to drop a whole box of detergent in the wash and call it good. What I am worried about is that I have had too many local cloth diapering moms come to me saying that they are using 1 tsp-2 tbsp of cloth diaper safe detergent" or mainstream and that their diapers are not getting clean. What's worse they even ask me if their diapers stink/ have ammonia because they are "using too much detergent" or have "detergent build up." That is what I am hoping people will understand. I use information from cloth diaper manufactures explicitly and agree with a lot of it. I wouldn't call it "junk science being passed off as gospel" its just a compilation of information from a combination of cloth diaper retailers (and other sources). I fully support cloth diaper companies who give solid diaper washing information and will continue to support those that do. I just wanted to make a easy resource of all good cloth diaper washing information in one spot.

    As for bleach being corrosive I don't mean to ever imply that bleach isn't a chemical to be used with discretion or that it doesn't have corrosive properties, nor do I think their is "conspiracy" against bleach. I wouldn't want people using it undiluted or without taking proper care. But if people are going to sanitize used diapers it is absolutely what I will recommend. I completely agree that inhaling bleach fumes is not something you should do, I don't use it for regular house cleaning (and don't think you should). But bleach properly measured in my washing machine, then broken down with hot water to me is worse that the alternative of unsanitary diapers (in situations of used diapers or candidia). Also I have consulted the Clorox website and bleaching diapers is well within their instructed uses, and it is suggested by Bum Genius and Grovia in situations that warrant it.

    ReplyDelete
  29. When using tide or gain does it have to be powder or can you use the liquid form?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Either is fine. My HE machine hates liquid so I have to use powder but ultimately its whatever you prefer.

      Delete
  30. I have read through this blog and all the comments, and am finally thinking I need to go your route First my LO had a yeast rash, and a woman who owns her own cloth diaper/all natural store (where I've gotten many of my CDs) told me that hot water is enough to kill yeast. I have been using creams and paper diapers to clear up any rash, but when I return to the cloth diaper, my LO gets red again. I have been using Rockin Green detergent and Funk Rock to get rid of ammonia smell--to no avail. I have washed, and washed, and washed with no luck and LOTS of frustration. I've even tried to dry the diapers in the sun to help "bleach" them.
    My cousin uses and sent me samples of Tide Ultra for cloth diapers.From your post, I'm guessing this is a fine brand of Tide to use. Are there any other suggestions, hints, etc that you can give me to help get rid of redness and the ammonia smell once and for all? I am also planning on using sanitizing bleach to help "clean" any bacteria from the diapers. Thank you in advance for any help/suggestions!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Check out this post it is all about bleaching. http://cgmrb.blogspot.com/2013/12/cloth-diapering-myth-busters-yeast-and.html

      Wash the diaper in tide or any mainstream detergent without downey or snuggle. Use the full recommended amount per load size. Then soak in sanitizing bleach for at least a 30 minutes. I use the bathtub for this. The measurement is 1 tbs bleach to 1 gallon water. About a 1/2 cup a tub.

      Then rewash them in hot water to break down the bleach.

      For yeast you need to switch to disposables after bleaching or put bleach in every wash until a week after the rash clears.

      As for ammonia the bleaching will fix it and the tide will keep it away.

      Delete
  31. I LOVE this info but have been told wrong and am afraid of switching. I need my diapers to last for many more children. With that if I'm using an he washer for about 25-30 diapers what should my wash routine be? Right now I use country save its about four tablespoons. I put on prewash, super wash on heavy, max extract and hot cold. I do that wash once woth detergent and once without. To be honest its exhausting waiting for 3-4 hours for them to clean. Please email and getter suggestion of washing, detergent etc mitchell.Monica222@gmail.com. I want to make the switch but am scared ill ruin everything.

    ReplyDelete
  32. I love this article! I figured out pretty quick that with my HE top load washer I needed enough diapers in the load to have enough friction for the diapers to come clean, at least 11-15 prefolds per load. Any less and things don't get clean. I have added towels to the load to increase friction. I have also bleached diapers and wash with Tide. :)

    ReplyDelete
  33. Wow! It is a great blog. I am very grateful to you for sharing these words here with us. I always had to suffer a lot for washing those diapers which I was using for my child. But now I have decided to use only your suggested cloth diaper brands onwards.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Good post. I just came across your site and wanted to say that I’ve really enjoyed reading your posts.Thanks, Buy best powerful Washing Detergent Powder online India - Patanga

    ReplyDelete
  35. It’s a great blog on diapers! Thanks for sharing valuable information on diaper washing. Even top diaper brands won’t tell you this. I will definitely use these.

    ReplyDelete
  36. I am going to switch to Tide because our dipes have major stink and suspected ammonia burn to boot. All Free & Clear is what I've been using from the start - on little one's dipes and clothes. I'm somewhat concerned about using the regular, scented kind because I'd hate if that irritated baby's skin (of course, I have no clue if that would be the case but I'd hate to buy a bunch of detergent that I can't use). But I have an HE washer and I want to get the powdered kind..unfortunately it doesn't look like there is a Free & Gentle powdered detergent for HE washers. So...my options are Tide Free HE Liquid or regular Ultra Tide HE Powdered. Thoughts??

    ReplyDelete
  37. I just made the switch today to Tide Free and Gentle from a cloth diaper detergent. I didn't have any stink issues, but I was seeing some ammonia burns pop up on the little one. I have a front loader and got the powder. I'm hoping that it will work for us, because I really do love clothing diapering!

    ReplyDelete
  38. Thank for your sharing. Very good information and Inspiring & Interesting.

    All fancy dress for rent in India. At Rentalwala you can buy and rent second hand fancy dress rent shops in India.

    Visit us : Fancy Dress On Rent

    ReplyDelete
  39. you dont need those extra rinses! also be sure to test for hard water, if you have hard water you will need to be using a scoop of water softer like either calgon or borax in each load. the fluff love and cd science fb group has tons of info on why the extra rinses arent needed and why a water softener is needed if you have hard water.

    ReplyDelete
  40. This article is great! I just wanted to say that I use Rockin' Green soap and completely love it. I like that I can get a formula for the hard water I have. I hadn't seen that in other laundry detergents. I don't have to add anything to get it to work well and it comes in fun scents, too. It's been great for my kid's sensitive skin, too! www.rockingreensoap.com

    ReplyDelete
  41. I am just getting started on my cloth diapering journey as our first child is not due to make its arrival until the beginning of July 2015. I am a Farm/Ranch wife and full time Ag Teacher who is in love with her HE front loading washing machine. The washing machine at our house has to work pretty hard and so far it can get anything clean. It can handle our clothes that are covered in everything from manure and calf poop, to diesel fuel, oil, gasoline, and more dirt and mud than I ever thought was possible. I am sure that if my machine can handle all this and get things not only looking clean but smelling great I am sure cloth diapers are going to be childs play for it. I do use homemade laundry soap in my machine with all our clothes, because it is what I have found that gets things really, really clean (smell and stain free). My homemade detergent consists of borax, washing soda, baking soda, Oxy Clean, Fels napth soap grated up, and Purex washing crystals. I do have hard water and this detergent has changed my life when it comes to laundry :) Would I be able to use this detergent on my synthetic or natural fiber diapers? If I can't use my homemade detergent should I be looking for a detergent that also contains an enzyme ingredient to breakdown organic compounds, or is that not important when selecting the right kind of detergent? Also, would I be able to use vinegar in the place of softener? I do this with farm clothes for 2 reasons. First, vinegar is an acid and acids can and do kill bacteria (it does not sterilize, but it definitely cuts down on the bacterial load that can cause stink in farm jeans). Secondly, since vinegar is an acid and acids neutralize bases and bases can build up in fabrics and cause them to be rough and stink, and I hate stink and my husband hates rough. Also, since vinegar is an acid it also helps break down and denature lipids and proteins, so it is great at cutting grease and helping remove grease stains. I know a lot of what you were talking about dealt with ammonia build up in cloth diapers and I was wondering if vinegar would help with that since ammonia is a base? Thank you for all the great information, and everything you have said makes sense to me and my knowledge of organic chemistry. Any insight to my questions you can offer would be great!

    ReplyDelete
  42. I don't know if my last comment posted! So sorry if this is a repeat: I need help! I've been using your wash routine with tide free and clear, and over the last few weeks the diapers have developed a distinct aquarium-like smell! What do I do?? Just use extra detergent? Is it possible to use too much? We have hard water, do I need to use a laundry treatment, does hard water cause that smell?

    ReplyDelete
  43. BRS strives to provide the safest Unique Eco friendly Baby Products also Maternity clothes, Diaper bags, Baby registry, Baby onesies & Baby nursery items. Here are avail cloth diapers, stroller, baby carrier, baby monitor, baby items, baby gifts,high chair, maternity clothes, changing pad and diaper bag.

    ReplyDelete
  44. You can take baby products on rent at www.rentlx.com

    ReplyDelete
  45. Everyone can find a wide range of baby products on rent at http://rentlx.com/

    ReplyDelete
  46. I'm trying to convince my wife to cloth diaper. She is against it because she thinks that there will be bacteria build up in the washing machine that will leak into our other clothes from the diapers with poo on them. Can someone send me a link proving to her that this isn't the case and that everything will still be clean and free of bacteria??!!! Please and thank you!!

    ReplyDelete
  47. everybody dont need to worry about diaper cloth.because now www.myshopad.com bring a facility for u by this you can call any time baby siter and any time.so dont need to work just do anywhere and anything www.myshopad.com

    ReplyDelete
  48. Thank you for this!!! I used cloth diapers with my daughter for about 6 months and finally gave up because the washing routine was too labor intensive! And expensive! I had always wondered if our grandmothers used special soap and did all the crap I was told I "had to do" to keep her diapers clean and absorbent. Now I feel like I can give cloth another try for baby #2 due in September!! Thank you thank you!!

    ReplyDelete
  49. Hello Dear
    I love the cloth diaper very much and have been using for my baby. But very recently I discovered that the baby's bottom affected by some sort of rashes. I am not sure that are rashes caused by wearing the cloth diaper. Please advice me regarding this problem.
    Thanks for your nice write up.
    Lucyca
    www.idiaperrash.com

    ReplyDelete
  50. Hello Dear
    I love the cloth diaper very much and have been using for my baby. But very recently I discovered that the baby's bottom affected by some sort of rashes. I am not sure that are rashes caused by wearing the cloth diaper. Please advice me regarding this problem.
    Thanks for your nice write up.
    Lucyca
    www.idiaperrash.com

    ReplyDelete
  51. Positive site, where did u come up the information on this posting? I'm pleased I discovered it though, ill be checking back soon to find out what additional posts you include.

    talcum powder ovarian cancer faqs

    ReplyDelete
  52. Thank you for this article! I cloth diapered my daughter for 2 years and quit because I was sick of CD detergents, stripping and stinky diapers (she was also mostly potty trained). I'm starting to cloth again with my son and am completely changing my approach! Hoping to have an easier go this time around. Tide all the way!
    -s

    ReplyDelete
  53. Can I do the bizSAFE WSHMS course before the CEO goes for the bizSAFE workshop for
    CEO/Top Management?

    ReplyDelete
  54. Thank you so much for sharing - I was appalled at the price of Rocking Green and will no longer be buying it! I found this blog just when i was about to give up on MCN's

    ReplyDelete
  55. Can you use Tide liquid detergent on cloth diapers? Or do you only recommend Tide powder?

    ReplyDelete

  56. Nice post about diapers.Get latest coupons for kids wear,diapers check out firstcry coupons at pick4call

    ReplyDelete
  57. If someone is actually worried about build up or absobanct due to build up (usually comes from harsh fabric softeners) one can just use vinegar in the little washer dispenser that fabric softener usually goes in... Not only does it strip any build up that affects absobancy like in towels that people use a lot of fabric softener on... It also is a natural fabric softener and breaks down grime and removes odors.

    ReplyDelete
  58. Awesome .... this weblog is fantastic, I love reading your posts. Keep up the great work! You understand, many persons are hunting around for this information, you could aid them greatly. skin bleaching

    ReplyDelete
  59. Water softeners are specific ion exchangers that are designed to remove ions, which are positively charged.Softeners mainly remove calcium (Ca2+) and magnesium (Mg2+) ions. Calcium and magnesium are often referred to as
    'hardness minerals'.Softeners are sometimes even applied to remove iron. The softening devices are able to remove up to five milligrams per litre (5 mg/L) of dissolved iron.Softeners can operate automatic, semi-automatic, or manual.Each type is rated on the amount of hardness it can remove before regeneration is necessary.By Best water softener in chennai

    ReplyDelete
  60. I was wondering, have you ever had anyone use the "free and clear" Boolean detergent. I really like the one I'm using now from them (the Sports one) and was wondering if their detergent would be strong enough to clean diapers as well.

    ReplyDelete
  61. Everything health & beauty related can be found at Total Beauty.Learn how to take care of your health and beauty where to buy ecomaxx cream here.Fortunately,Total Beauty has a health and beauty guide that will take the guesswork out of finding the best products,advice, and tips for you on our site ww.fitsow.com

    ReplyDelete
  62. اعمال الفنين الذين يقومون باعمال التسريب تتم بدقة تامة حيث لدينا في
    شركة كشف تسربات المياه بالدمام الاليات والاجهزة الحديثة التي تساعدهم في اكتشاف ذلك بدون اي تكسير او تدمير فاعمال كشف التسربات لدينا في
    شركة كشف تسربات بالدمام تتم عندما باحترافية كاملة دون اللجوء الي اعمال تقليدية كل هذه الخدمات لا تلقها الا مع شركة ركن البيت التي لديها كل اهتمام بالاعمال التي تقدمها لدينا نفس الخدمات في مدينة الرياض بواسطة البحث عن شركة كشف تسربات المياه بالرياض التي نقوم بها بجدية تامة للوصول الي رضاء العملاء فنحن في شركة كشف تسربات بالرياض نعطيك كافة الضمانات التي تعطيك الصلاحية في الحصول علي عمل سليم


    ReplyDelete
  63. This is highly informatics, crisp and clear. I think that everything has been described in systematic manner so that reader could get maximum information and learn many things.
    http://clearviewsurfaces.com

    ReplyDelete
  64. Thank you! So many websites contradicting other sites about what detergent to use! I will continue my gain powder dl detergent or all liquid! I was getting so mad on knowing the real truth about these special detergents and worried about ruining the expensive investments of cloth diapering

    ReplyDelete
  65. Most of the time I don’t make comments on any post, but I'd like to say that this content is really helpful. Please share with us more post like this.
    Ultrasonic Level Sensor

    ReplyDelete
  66. After reading your comments about myth #1 I need to know what is your source information or is this just your experience? I make cloth diapers and I include information on Care for them. I do not have any babies left to experiment. Also I have my inserts with "fancy absorbent materials" in them (Zorb). I really want to pass on correct information and I do believe that one of the problems with cloth diapering is the mega businesses whether cloth diaper companies or disposable companies. I am a small business woman and I know that families are tired of the complicated world aka stress and expense and chemicals! Thank you :)

    ReplyDelete
  67. I'm just starting out in learning how to cloth diaper, I'm transitioning from disposables. If she ends up getting a rash due to teething or so, do I need to strip the diapers that are being used?

    ReplyDelete
  68. I'm just starting out in learning how to cloth diaper, I'm transitioning from disposables. If she ends up getting a rash due to teething or so, do I need to strip the diapers that are being used?

    ReplyDelete
  69. Thank you for sharing the information here. And if you are looking for the better cleaning services you may choose from us


    Housekeeping Services in Mumbai

    Sofa Cleaning Services Mumabai

    Car Spa Mumbai

    ReplyDelete
  70. Very nice post here and thanks for it .I always like and such a super contents of these post.Excellent and very cool idea and great content of different kinds of the valuable information's.
    PEGA Training in Chennai

    ReplyDelete
  71. Hope it may be useful at any costs.And please keep post like this. Really useful information. Thank you very much.

    Medical Insurance Dubai

    Health Insurance Dubai

    Insurance Companies in Dubai

    ReplyDelete
  72. It is amazing and wonderful to visit your site.Thanks for sharing this information,this is useful to me...
    Android Training in Chennai
    Ios Training in Chennai

    ReplyDelete
  73. Thank you for sharing. And if you are looking for the best relocation process can make easier by our beneficial relocation services with

    Frigate Logistics and Movers Pte Ltd

    Movers and Packers in Singapore

    Lorry Rental Singapore

    Van Rental Singapore

    ReplyDelete
  74. Thank you for taking the time and sharing this information with us. It was indeed very helpful and insightful while being straight forward and to the point.
    mcdonaldsgutscheine | startlr | saludlimpia

    ReplyDelete
  75. I used rocking green for my boys and ended up with stinky diapers that I could figure out how to get it out. I’m gonna be doing cloth again. If everything you said is true I’m amazed. Goes against everything I thought I knew lol. I’m gonna try tide and see how it goes.

    ReplyDelete
  76. This is the most comprehensive post on CDs that I have come across. Unlike most other CD blogs, this one actually makes my life easier.. Thank you !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Do you recommend any procedure that one should follow before switching detergents?

      Delete